Thursday, June 4, 2020

How international students can get the most out of a U.S. internship

So you’ve received an internship offer. Congrats! But now what? Being an international student looking for an internship in the U.S. can be challenging. Needless to say, the competition is tough. You’re one among many—in addition to the U.S. citizens themselves. That means networking is a go-big-or-go-home scenario. Youll want to grab every opportunity to attend events for the chance of a possible referral. But  after several weeks—or months—of sending out resumes and asking for recommendation letters, it does get better. Once you do get an offer,  here’s my advice on how to get the most out of your internship: 1. Develop a strong professional relationship with your boss This also goes for your other senior colleagues. They can be valuable career advisors in the long run, whom you can ask questions about potential career paths in your field. Invite them for a coffee break and get to know them—talk about anything under the sun. They might even be able to provide you with a strong recommendation in the future. 2.  Communicate Interpersonal relationship skills are not something you master in a classroom. They are something you foster in a work environment. Learn by speaking with your colleagues and asking questions. Show that you are deeply interested. And remember that you may not know everything yet. This is why, above all else, pay attention to the small things at work that will help you grow as an intern and as a professional. 3. Connect the things in the classroom with things at work Hopefully, your internship is related to your field of interest. I went straight for my Master’s degree at Hult after graduating from my Applied Mathematics undergraduate degree. This means that I do not have enough professional experience yet for a job at a private equity firm, but I am all the more interested to learn about it. This is where an internship comes in. My advice for those who do not have much work experience when doing an internship is this: see how the textbook concepts apply to real work situations. My boss at my internship recently asked me the definition of â€Å"capital structure.† While I gave a textbook definition (â€Å"the relation of debt to equity†), he taught me that there’s more to it than that in reality. 4. Enjoy yourself Commit to the desire of growing as a professional, but at the same time, have fun with colleagues. Have a picnic in the park when time permits, or grab a drink on a Friday night. Keep in touch with them after the internship. Did you know that a fellow Hult Global Ambassador helped me secure my internship? He gave me an overview of how the company operates and what the workload of an intern is like. 5. Use your new skills to build your professional profile Don’t treat your internship as just another line on your resume. Be sure to update your LinkedIn  to show how the skills and experience youve gained boost your value as a job candidate. LinkedIn has a unique way of using data that allows you to figure out the keywords often searched for by recruiters and employers in your industry. Use this to your advantage. It’s also not a bad thing to try out the Premium Account, which allows you to see the people who visit your page—you never know, this person might be looking for the skills that you have! Don’t treat your internship as just another line on your resume. Whether you’re a full-time or part-time intern, have a clear goal in mind for what you want to get out of it. Aim to learn another skill or for a company goal to be achieved with the help of you and your team. The sky is the limit and the opportunities for an international student are boundless—you just have to make the most out of your experience. Interested in learning more about the career paths of recent Hult grads?  Download our latest Global Careers Report. Make the most of what your career has to offer with a Masters in International Business from Hult. To learn more, take a look at our blog Student stories: Our internship experience, or give your employability a huge boost with an MBA in international business. Download a brochure or get in touch today to find out how Hult can help you to explore everything about the business world, the future, and yourself. Hult Rotation offers you a chance to study in a truly global way. Our rotation program allows you to study and be immersed in some of the finest cities in the world. 📠¸: @jasminmanzano . Hult Rotation offers you a chance to study in a truly global way. Our rotation program allows you to study and be immersed in some of the finest cities in the world. 📠¸: @jasminmanzano . Each year, Hult seeks to enroll a talented and ambitious incoming class from all over the world. We look for diverse students with a wide range of experiences, perspectives, and interests—students who will thrive in our unique educational atmosphere. Are you ready for a truly global experience? 📠¸: @iambrunadiniz . Each year, Hult seeks to enroll a talented and ambitious incoming class from all over the world. We look for diverse students with a wide range of experiences, perspectives, and interests—students who will thrive in our unique educational atmosphere. Are you ready for a truly global experience? 📠¸: @iambrunadiniz . We’re excited to start 2020 on a ranking high! Hult is proud to have been placed #28 in Poets Quants 2020 rankings for Best Undergraduate Business Schools in the US. Taking a huge leap of 32 places from our 2019 position, we’re also very happy to have secured top positions in key categories like: life-changing experience, practicality of the degree, and global immersion. . With five global campuses, a student body of over 130 nationalities, and a learn-by-doing approach—Hult offers a student experience like no other. . We’re excited to start 2020 on a ranking high! Hult is proud to have been placed #28 in Poets Quants 2020 rankings for Best Undergraduate Business Schools in the US. Taking a huge leap of 32 places from our 2019 position, we’re also very happy to have secured top positions in key categories like: life-changing experience, practicality of the degree, and global immersion. . With five global campuses, a student body of over 130 nationalities, and a learn-by-doing approach—Hult offers a student experience like no other. . â€Å"I’m from an engineering background and needed a whole new skill set for the industry I wanted to switch to. I learned a lot about myself and how I deal with being out of my comfort zone. I learned both soft and hard skills, from how to work in very diverse teams to key accounting metrics and strategy. I was surprised by how weak I was at certain tasks in English or how strong I actually was in other areas. Hult gave me opportunities to try new things and meet people from places I never thought I would have friends. . My internship experiences gave me the chance to broaden my view of different cultures and different companies. I had the opportunity to work and live with people whose values differed from people in my home country. I thought that this would be difficult, but it gave me the chance to reflect on my own values and assess if they were a result of my home country environment or if they were intrinsically mine. . Diederick ter Kulve (@diederick.terkulve) Netherlands Masters in International Business . â€Å"I’m from an engineering background and needed a whole new skill set for the industry I wanted to switch to. I learned a lot about myself and how I deal with being out of my comfort zone. I learned both soft and hard skills, from how to work in very diverse teams to key accounting metrics and strategy. I was surprised by how weak I was at certain tasks in English or how strong I actually was in other areas. Hult gave me opportunities to try new things and meet people from places I never thought I would have friends. . My internship experiences gave me the chance to broaden my view of different cultures and different companies. I had the opportunity to work and live with people whose values differed from people in my home country. I thought that this would be difficult, but it gave me the chance to reflect on my own values and assess if they were a result of my home country environment or if they were intrinsically mine. . Diederick ter Kulve (@diederick.terkulve) Netherlands Masters in International Business . Say a big hello to our Bachelor of Business Administration program cover star, Elisa Orus Plana âÅ" ¨ . â€Å"I’m excited for the future—especially that I cant predict whats going to happen. Maybe Ill end up in Mexico working for a trading company or maybe in Africa, developing my own business. Everything is possible, and the options are constantly changing. I love the idea that Im never going to be stuck doing the same job until the end of my life if I dont want it to be like this. . Hult really supports me and my ambitions and truly believes that we deserve to be considered as professionals as well as students. Here, I get to express not just my opinions but all elements of myself. From my creative side with the Fashion Society to my finance and business sides in Trading Club and the Management Consulting Club. We get a different type of learning here. Not just essential knowledge and theory, but practical skills and mindset. The school is always evolving. We’re encouraged to innovate and to always look for new ways of doing traditional things. We learn how to be more confident and become aware of how we can impact our environment. The school aims to help you become a better version of yourself and to stand out from the crowd.â€Å" . Elisa Orus Plana French Bachelor of Business Administration Class of 2021 Say a big hello to our Bachelor of Business Administration program cover star, Elisa Orus Plana âÅ" ¨ . â€Å"I’m excited for the future—especially that I cant predict whats going to happen. Maybe Ill end up in Mexico working for a trading company or maybe in Africa, developing my own business. Everything is possible, and the options are constantly changing. I love the idea that Im never going to be stuck doing the same job until the end of my life if I dont want it to be like this. . Hult really supports me and my ambitions and truly believes that we deserve to be considered as professionals as well as students. Here, I get to express not just my opinions but all elements of myself. From my creative side with the Fashion Society to my finance and business sides in Trading Club and the Management Consulting Club. We get a different type of learning here. Not just essential knowledge and theory, but practical skills and mindset. The school is always evolving. We’re encouraged to innovate and to always look for new ways of doing traditional things. We learn how to be more confident and become aware of how we can impact our environment. The school aims to help you become a better version of yourself and to stand out from the crowd.â€Å" . Elisa Orus Plana French Bachelor of Business Administration Class of 2021"> During the final days of 2019, you probably reflected on what you’ve accomplished this year—and even this decade—and what you’d like to achieve in 2020. Let us know in the comments below. During the final days of 2019, you probably reflected on what you’ve accomplished this year—and even this decade—and what you’d like to achieve in 2020. Let us know in the comments below. â€Å"The first time we did group work on the program, I went head-to-head with a colleague. It taught me a lot about how I see people, how people see me, and how conflict can be resolved in a kind and productive way. The best feedback you get, when delivered constructively, is the most critical because it really feeds into how you lead. I’ve completely reversed my leadership style—the result is so much richer and more powerful when you lead from behind and lead with strength. . Studying in tandem with working, whilst challenging, gave me the perfect platform to directly apply learning concepts into my business environment, the competitive landscape, and the real-estate industry as a whole. When I started the program, I was very happy in my corporate role. But my courage and aspirations grew to the point that I took on a whole new direction. Having my career coach, Joanna, as a sounding board allowed me to really be strategic and get to know myself. She coached me thro ugh all the interviews, the research, and the questions. It went in parallel with what I was doing academically and after six months everything just clicked. . I went into the EMBA knowing I had nothing to lose and I’ve come out with everything. Great strength, global friends, amazing learning, mentors from professors, a job I love, and the knowledge that I can set my mind to achieve anything and with the right support and resources I’ll get there.† . Kashani Wijetunga British, New Zealand Sri Lankan Associate Director Senior Strategy Consultant CBRE EMBA Class of 2019 . â€Å"The first time we did group work on the program, I went head-to-head with a colleague. It taught me a lot about how I see people, how people see me, and how conflict can be resolved in a kind and productive way. The best feedback you get, when delivered constructively, is the most critical because it really feeds into how you lead. I’ve completely reversed my leadership style—the result is so much richer and more powerful when you lead from behind and lead with strength. . Studying in tandem with working, whilst challenging, gave me the perfect platform to directly apply learning concepts into my business environment, the competitive landscape, and the real-estate industry as a whole. When I started the program, I was very happy in my corporate role. But my courage and aspirations grew to the point that I took on a whole new direction. Having my career coach, Joanna, as a sounding board allowed me to really be strategic and get to know myself. She coached me thro ugh all the interviews, the research, and the questions. It went in parallel with what I was doing academically and after six months everything just clicked. . I went into the EMBA knowing I had nothing to lose and I’ve come out with everything. Great strength, global friends, amazing learning, mentors from professors, a job I love, and the knowledge that I can set my mind to achieve anything and with the right support and resources I’ll get there.† . Kashani Wijetunga British, New Zealand Sri Lankan Associate Director Senior Strategy Consultant CBRE EMBA Class of 2019 . â€Å"It was now or never. I knew that I’d have likely stayed in my neighborhood for years to come if I didn’t take this opportunity. I’d not lived or studied outside of the U.S. before. So I left my job as a global strategist at an advertising agency and moved halfway around the world. I’ve come back a more culturally aware, well-versed person. I’ve realized that everything is a learning experience and an opportunity for growth. Ill definitely carry this mindset with me into the future. Technology and social media allow us to be different people in several places at once. Im excited to see how I can establish myself in whatever city Ill be lucky enough to call home and still maintain deep connections with people all over the world. I’m inspired by my classmates every day. Hearing some of their life stories and how getting this degree fits into their greater mission has been very humbling. My biggest challenge has been finding the ‘right’ path for me. There have been rooms Ive felt like I shouldnt be in, but now Im proud to feel as though I truly belong, wherever I am.† . Dwayne Logan, Jnr. American MBA Class of 2019 . â€Å"It was now or never. I knew that I’d have likely stayed in my neighborhood for years to come if I didn’t take this opportunity. I’d not lived or studied outside of the U.S. before. So I left my job as a global strategist at an advertising agency and moved halfway around the world. I’ve come back a more culturally aware, well-versed person. I’ve realized that everything is a learning experience and an opportunity for growth. Ill definitely carry this mindset with me into the future. Technology and social media allow us to be different people in several places at once. Im excited to see how I can establish myself in whatever city Ill be lucky enough to call home and still maintain deep connections with people all over the world. I’m inspired by my classmates every day. Hearing some of their life stories and how getting this degree fits into their greater mission has been very humbling. My biggest challenge has been finding the ‘right’ path for me. There have been rooms Ive felt like I shouldnt be in, but now Im proud to feel as though I truly belong, wherever I am.† . Dwayne Logan, Jnr. American MBA Class of 2019 . Happy New Year, Hultians! . Happy New Year, Hultians! .

Sunday, May 17, 2020

Examine the Reasons for Changes in the Patterns of...

â€Å"Examine the reasons for changes in the patterns of marriage, divorce and cohabitation over the past 40 years.† The patterns of marriage, divorce and cohabitation over the past 40 years has varied considerably. In 1972, over 480,000 couples got married subsequently making this the highest amount of marriages within a year ever since the Second World War. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) this was down to the baby boom generation of the 1950’s reaching the age of marriage. However, after this period, the number of marriages in England went into decline. Recently, marriages reached an all-time low in 2005 when only 244,701 couples got married. Less than half of what it was in 1972. Some people accuse society of rejecting†¦show more content†¦In the terms of Divorce – the legal termination of marriage, this has increased immensely since 1971 due to the change in legislation that had liberalized divorce, made it cheaper and easier to obtain. The Divorce Reform Act of 1971 was the most important because prior to 1971, one partner had to provide ‘evidence’ that they had been wronged by the significant other (matrimonial offence). Due to the change of the law, it allowed people to divorce on the basis of â€Å"irretrievable breakdown†. In addition, since 1984, the Matrimonial and Family Proceedings Act reduced the time limit for divorce for a minimum of 3 years of marriage to only one year. After this act, the divorce rate shot up again, as it did in 1971. Now, people were finally able to legally to end all connections, as previously when divorce was either too expensive or difficult to obtain, separation was very common, which was when a couple decided to live away from each other. To go into more detail of the trend of increased divorces, in 1993, the number of divorces peaked at 180,000. By 2000, this figure had fallen to 154,000, although the years 2001 – 2004 have seen a gradual rise to 167,100. There is now almost as many divorces as there is marriages and if recent trends continues, almost 40% of marriages will end in divorce. An adequate reason for this increased style of divorcing is that it is no longer linked with stigma and shame. The British culture is hugely based on Christian beliefs and one of theseShow MoreRelatedThe Reasons for Changes in the Patterns of Marriage, Cohabitation and Divorce in the last 30 Years845 Words   |  4 PagesThe Reasons for Changes in the Patterns of Marriage, Cohabitation and Divorce in the last 30 Years Over the last 30 years there has been a significant change in the pattern for marriage, co-habitation and divorce. There are many reasons for these changes that have taken place. For example, since 1971, when a divorce act was introduced, divorce has been more acceptable in todays society. This has slowly increased the figures of divorce at a steady rate. A downfall in religionRead MoreSociology - Part Of Childbearing Essay1637 Words   |  7 PagesExamine Changes in the Patterns of Childbearing and Childrearing in the UK Since The 1970’s In the last 40 years, patterns for both childbearing, which is having children, and childrearing (which is the primary socialisation of children) have changed due to several different reasons. Since the 1970’s less children are born outside of marriage, we know this due to statistics which show that over four out of ten children are now born outside of marriage which is five times more than in the earlyRead MoreSociology5053 Words   |  21 Pageschanged as families have changed, and many feminists use the term ‘dual burden’ to describe the woman’s role in the family today. Item 2B Government policies and laws include tax and benefit policies as well as legislation such as relating to divorce and marriage. Sociologists have different views on the impact of these policies and laws on families. For example, feminists argue that social policies assume that the ideal family is a patriarchal nuclear family, and that government policies and laws thereforeRead MoreScly1 Past Papers7036 Words   |  29 Pagesincorporate this into your plan. June 2015 Examine the impact of government policies and laws on family life. [24 marks] From the mark scheme: Concepts and issues such as the following may appear: patriarchy; familism; surveillance; ideological control; gender regimes; marital breakdown; family structure; family diversity; welfare dependency; underclass; reserve army of labour Policies/laws on abortion; divorce; contraception; reproductive technology; marriage; adoption; pensions; benefits; taxes; education;Read MoreExamine the Reasons for the Increase in Uk Family and Household Diversity in the Last 40 Years2165 Words   |  9 Pages. Examine the reasons for the increase in family and household diversity in the last 40 years (24 marks, 10 A01, 14 A02) Family and household diversity is the change in patterns among the various family and household types that exist because of factors such as secularisation, changes to legislation, changes in womens position, changing attitudes In the past 40 years the family structure within the UK has changed quite dramaticallyRead MoreFad2230 Exam 1 Study Guide2832 Words   |  12 PagesClose Relationships Family: a relationship by blood, marriage, or affection, in which members may cooperate economically, may care for children, may consider their identity to be intimately connected to the larger group. The U.S. Census Bureau Two or more people living together who are related by birth, marriage, or adoption. Family of Orientation: the family that you are born into. Family of procreation: the Family you make through marriage, partnering, /or parenthood. Fictive kin: NonrelativesRead MoreMarriage and Cohabitation13809 Words   |  56 Pagesis Marriage 1.2 What is Cohabitation CHAPTER TWO – ORIGIN OF MARRIAGE 2.1 Types of Marriage 2.2 Justification of Marriage 2.3 Christian Perspective of Marriage 2.4 Advantages and dis-advantages of Marriage CHAPTER THREE – ORIGIN OF COHABITATION 3.1 Types of Cohabitation 3.2 Justification of Cohabitation 3.3 Christian perspective of Cohabitation 3.4 Advantages and dis- advantages of Cohabitation CHAPTER FOUR – MARRIAGE AND COHABITATION 4.1 Relationship between Marriage and Cohabitation 4.2Read MoreAnnotated Bibliography Of Family Life1412 Words   |  6 Pageschanging world. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen and Unwin. †¢ Sociologists use the term ‘families’ in plural rather than ‘family’ to represent the variations in family life. †¢ Societal changes contributed to divorce rates, focusing more on personal happiness, higher martial satisfaction and women ability to survive economically outside marriage. †¢ Extended family households were more prevalent before industrialism and were more widespread among indigenous people prior to colonization. †¢ The wife takes on the expressiveRead MoreFamily7546 Words   |  31 Pagessame household.† There is no correct definition on the family, Sociologists do not agree on a definition, broadly there are two types of definition; †¢ Exclusive definitions – These focus on the specific relationships within the family unit i.e. marriage †¢ Inclusive definitions – These focus on the functions of the unit e.g. support. The Cereal Packet Family A popular image of the family in Britain in the late twentieth century has been described as the cereal packet family. The ‘happyRead MoreMarriage12231 Words   |  49 PagesAND ITS BACKGROUND INTRODUCTION Marriage is one of the deepest and most complex involvements of human relationships. It is a corner stone of society and a very necessary part of the social system. It is a crucial and sacred bond between two personalities merging into one for ideas, attitudes, habits and likes and dislikes. In Philippines marriage is considered a lifelong partnership. It is the foundation stone on which the family is built. Basically marriage is a social and legal contract. People

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Spread of Islam in India - 1409 Words

According to the statistics of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting of India the third largest Muslim population of the world is embedded in India. Even though the major religion of India is Hinduism, and Islam is in the second place of its minor religion still it has the largest Muslim minority all over the world (World Directory of Minorities- Muslim of India). This statistics clearly depicts the successful expansion and establishment of Islam in early period of India even though India was populated with indigenous religious beliefs. Islam is a monotheistic religion that was spread with bunch of beliefs and faiths after the Prophet Mohammad. In order to that the colonization of Muslims initiated in India was the key place from where†¦show more content†¦Thus they didn’t find any difficulty in preaching their faiths, beliefs and practices to the people. With the contribution of Muslim traders and merchants Islam positioned in India and spread to South East Asia through it. The accommodation of Islam stabilized by traders with their tolerant attitude as well as their teachings and preaching. Completely different perspective of equality in Islamic belief system from Hinduism, which was the indigenous major religion in India,made the swift conversion of Islam. History Professor of University of Gottingen Tibi Bassan insisted that the â€Å"Islam specifically attracted warriors and also people from the lowest castes, drawn by the promise of spiritual equality rather than the Hindu ideas of successive reincarnations† (54). The Hinduism was socially stratified and it was strictly adapted the caste system and the lower caste people were separated from the society. In order to this Islam was more egalitarian than the Hinduism. Even though the Muslims portrayed into caste system and Jatis they were in union in the name of religion Islam (Ahmad, Reifeld 15). Thus they were not fight into them like Hindus, as they were not stratified. So this radical form of equality in Islam gave hopes to lower caste and separated people in indigenous religious people. The conversionShow M oreRelatedSimilarities Between Hinduism And Buddhism942 Words   |  4 PagesEssay Hinduism and Buddhism were both founded and popular in northern India by 600 CE. Although Hinduism and the Hindu caste system maintained a strong influence in South Asia throughout 600-1750 CE, the Hindu majority eventually gave way as Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, and syncretic faiths gradually moved in and across the Indian Ocean basin by 1750 CE. Even then, Hinduism did spread from northern India through southern India to Southeast Asia. The caste system was maintained from 600-1750 CE,Read MoreThe Islamic Diffusion Of India1243 Words   |  5 PagesINTRODUCTION PARAGRAPH In the 600s, Arab traders were in contact with India. They would regularly go to the west coast of India to trade different goods, like African goods, spices, and gold. As the Arabs began to convert to Islam, the religion carried to the coast of India. The first mosque in India was built in 629, it is called the Cheraman Juma Masjid. The mosque was made in the Indian state Kerala. Islam continued to spread into Indian cities, by immigration and conversion, as the Arab MuslimsRead MoreThe Spread and Localization of Buddhism and Islam into Southeast Asia1659 Words   |  7 PagesThe spread of religion first began through contact with neighbouring countries which gradually expand throughout the years. Buddhism and Islam are one of the most widespread religions across Southeast Asian countries like Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. Trade merchants and imperial support of the religion were major factors in the facilitation and localization of the spread of Buddhism and Islam within Southeast Asia. However, there were also limitations presentedRead MoreThe Rise and Spread of Islam1129 Words   |  5 PagesThe Rise and Spread of Islam The world you once knew is falling to ashes and food is become such a scarcity that people are fighting over a few pieces of bread. The political class is too busy fighting among themselves to care for anyone else. Children are roaming the streets and begging for work to feed their dying, hungry stomachs. This is not a scene from a horror movie, but rather the reality of the beginning of post classical era. In these times of hardship the people turned to a higher powerRead MoreSoutheast Asia And The Middle East And North Africa1426 Words   |  6 Pagescolonies are predominantly Christian. In contrast, more than 40% of the population in Southeast Asia practices Islam, making it the most widely practiced religion in the region (Pew Research Center s Religion Public Life Project, 2012). In fact, Southeast Asia contains the highest number of Muslims in the world, surpassing the Middle East and North Africa. The region is heavily influenced by Islam and European imperialism and it†™s shown in the region’s architecture and cuisine. Southeast Asia has aRead MoreThe Islam During The Postclassical Period916 Words   |  4 Pagesfounded the religion known as Islam during the postclassical period. He claimed to hear voices while meditating alone and believed this voice to be that of a higher being. He declared himself the last prophet and formed the Islamic religion on the belief that at the end of time, on Judgment Day, everyone would be resurrected and either have eternal punishment in hellfire or eternal joy in paradise. Islam grew in popularity around the world when Muslim merchants spread across the Indian Ocean in searchRead MoreIndian Encounters:The Turks, The Mongols, and Islam985 Words   |  4 Pagesnonetheless, India and ancient Indian civilization. After the fall of the Gupta Empire in 480, small kingdoms throughout the region, which was invaded by the Turks and Mongols, but was not conquered, would rule India. The northern parts of India frequently were raided and invaded by the Turks, all the way f rom Afghanistan to Central Asia. Muslim Turks decided to rule a state in north India called the Delhi sultanate, which was ruled for several centuries, and in the mean time Islam gained its adherentsRead MoreSimilarities between Beliefs and Philosophies from the World1637 Words   |  7 Pagesthe world around. One ended up with the result of a supreme power controlling the whole world. Different myths and legends established various legends in different parts of the world accordingly. Later established religions spread across the world. One major cause for the spread of religion was of trade and missionaries. QUESTION: What are the various beliefs held in my community and how do they influence an individual on a minor and a major scale plus what happens when ideologies clash? What areRead MoreGlobal Religions of Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism1054 Words   |  4 Pagesrise of new, global religions such as Islam, Buddhism, and Christianity. The spread of these new religions all shared certain unique aspects of spreading. These three religions shared what made them global and universal. Christianity, Islam, and Buddhism, fit the definition of world religion for the reasons that they each were not culturally specific nor gender specific, incorporated other religions and appealed to all social classes and these religions spread by way of war and conquests, trade, eliteRead MoreThe Religion Of The Hajj1734 Words   |  7 Pages Throughout time, many aspects of life have changed in drastic ways. One common thing around the world, no matter where you are, that has evolved is over time is religion. One religion that has changed has been Islam. Something that unites all Muslims is a common belief they have; The Five Pillars. These Pillars allow the Muslim community to become one regardless of their social statue. One of the most changed of these would be the Pilgrimage to Mecca. Also known as the Hajj, â€Å" Every adult Muslim

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Unknown Paper free essay sample

The unknown project was a very good realization of me and my partner going out by our selves. The very first day of the Unknown project I was acquainted with Denise who was very friendly and was very nice as far as assisting me in the project. The first day we were introduced too various different forms of the unknown such as broth, Blood agar plate, MSA plate, MAC plate, and the EMB plate. Before that we had done the 3 phase isolate which we had a possible of 10 points of achieving. In the isolation plate we had too take the sample of our unknown, which was the letter G. A fter we had done the 3-phase isolation plate we inoculated half of the plate, which was the S/D media. The Plate’s that we had provided too us were the BAP, MSA, MAC, and EMB. When we were successfully inoculated the S/D media the plates were put in the Incubator at approximated 37 degrees Celsius. We will write a custom essay sample on Unknown Paper or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page The second day we had came into the laboratory we had too read the Nutrient Agar plate that was the one that we had too the 3 phase isolation plate. My results were somewhat correct but I had a lot of backtracking. After that we had too read the S/D Media, which we had, too diagram and describe each of the plates that we had put in the incubator. Once they had come out of the Incubator the results that I had achieved was the MSA plate was yellow, stinky, I did have growth, there were a positive match for small colonies, and was shiny. The second one that I had achieved was on the MAC plate. The color on this specific plate was red, it had smelled rotten, there was definitely some growth on the plate the texture was shiny and was not raised. Out of these plates I had somewhat of a indication of what the specimen was since after the gram stain we had done in lab we found out that on the MSA plate we had achieved Gram positive bacillus and on the other one we achieve Gram negative bacillus which was the MAC plate. In that same day that we achieved the results we had too start the procedure on the  enterotube. The specimen that we used on that was from the MAC plate. Once we had scooped up the media from the MAC plate we had followed the correct procedure too drag the entire media throughout all the test subjects that were in the enterotube. After we were done with that we had too incubate the enterotube at 37 degrees Celsius. The third day of lab we came in and started reading our enterotube that was incubator. We had later noticed that the eneterotube’s were left in the incubator for a little too long which has damaged some of the results in the testing. For the most part we had a indication of what our gram positive was and we had found what our gram negative result by the appendix that we had used in our book. After all the testing with our gram stains and enterotube’s we had found out our Gram positive Specimen ended up being Micrococcus luteus. Then we had found out our Gram negative specimen was Klebsiella Pneumoniae. Those were the results that me and my partner Denise ended up achieving.

Sunday, April 19, 2020

One

Introduction In an effort to use aptitude as well as students’ achievement among several demographic variables in determining high school seniors’ choice of career after high school, a survey was conducted among over 500 students.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on One-Way Manova specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More A one way multivariate analysis of variance was then conducted with â€Å"collplan† being the predictor variable whereas student’s career plan in college after high school had nine categorical variables including: agricultural college, no plans yet, liberal arts, none, engineering college, music/arts, teacher college, other and university. The quantitative outcome variables in this dataset were â€Å"abstract†- a test of abstract reasoning and â€Å"creative†- a test of creativity. The One-Way MANOVA was conducted in an attempt to answer the following question: How w ell do the categorical predictor variable â€Å"factors† (levels) predict scores on a.) a measure of abstract reasoning ability, and b.) a measure of creativity? After conducting a One-Way MANOVA on the dataset using SPSS, the results of the analyses were presented and interpreted as described in below. The author hypothesizes that categorical predictor variables (none, Teacher College, agricultural college, engineering college, liberal arts, music/arts, university, other, and no plans yet) are significant predictors of scores on a measure of abstract thinking ability and scores on a measure of creativity. This has been explained by the descriptive statistics as well as the MANOVA test, specifically the Wilk’s lambda and the between-subject effects of the variables. Descriptive Statistics The GLM statistics for between-subjects factors indicated that there were 178 seniors who did not plan to join any of the listed institutions in this study and this was the highest nu mber of students. This was followed by students who had plans of joining university and these amounted to 88 students. The third largest category of seniors had plans of doing liberal arts and these amounted to 59 students.Advertising Looking for essay on psychology? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More These were followed by 57 students who had â€Å"other† plans after high school. The number of those who had no plans yet was equal to that of students who wished to join a teachers college (38 students). There were 29 seniors who had plans of joining an engineering college, 11 who wished to do music/arts and finally only 4 students had plans of joining an agricultural college after high school (Table 1). From the descriptive statistics (Table 2), it is evident that having significant differences between the dependent variable and the independent variables may be somewhat impossible since some categorical variables have very large cell sizes (N) which are many times larger than the smallest cell size. For instance, the cell size for â€Å"none† is 178 whereas â€Å"agricultural college†, the smallest cell size has a size of N =4. For the fixed factor â€Å"abstract†, the mean abstract thinking for seniors who did not have plans after college (â€Å"none†) was 8.94, SD = 2.616 whereas the mean for those who had plans of joining a teacher college was the same as that of students who had plans of joining university i.e. 10.37, SD= 2.509 and 10.37, SD = 2.709 respectively and these were the highest means for the â€Å"abstract† category. The lowest mean was for students who wished to join an agricultural college, mean = 7.25, SD = 2.50 followed by those who did not have plans yet, mean = 8.84, SD = 2.881. The means for students who aspired to join an engineering college, do liberal arts and those who planned to do music/arts were 10.17 SD = 2.156, 9.97 SD = 3.129 and 10.09 SD= 2.914 respectively. Finally, the mean for abstract thinking for seniors who had other plans other than those included in the study was 9.74, SD = 2.482. Table 3 indicates that the 95% CI for â€Å"none† in predicting the abstract reasoning ability of high school students was 8.549 – 9.338 whereas the CI for â€Å"teacher college† on predicting the abstract reasoning ability was 95% CI (9.515 – 11.222). The 95 percent CI for â€Å"agricultural college† on determining abstract thinking was 4.619 – 9.881 whereas that of â€Å"engineering college† was 9.915 – 11.150. The confidence interval for â€Å"liberal arts† in determining abstract thinking was 95% CI (9.281 – 10.651) while the 95 percent CI for â€Å"music/arts† was 8.504 – 11.678. The 95% CI for â€Å"university† as a predictor of abstract thinking was 9.814 – 10.936 while the confidence interval for â€Å"other† was 95% CI (9.040 – 10.434). Finally the CI for â€Å"no plans yet,† as a determinant of abstract thinking was 95% CI (7.988 – 9.696). It is clear that all the categorical variables have their CI ranging from positive lower boundary value to a positive upper boundary value. This implies that the set of data is somewhat normally distributed as earlier confirmed by the Levene’s F statistic.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on One-Way Manova specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Table 3 also indicates that the 95% CI for â€Å"none† in predicting the creativity level of high school students was 8.084 – -9.163 whereas the CI for â€Å"teacher college† on predicting the creativity level was 95% CI (8.516 – 10.852). The 95 percent CI for â€Å"agricultural college† on determining creativity was 7.901 – 15.099 whereas that of â€Å"engineering college† was 11 .146 – 13.820. The confidence interval for â€Å"liberal arts† in determining creativity level of high school seniors was 95% CI (10.673 – 12.547) while the 95 percent CI for â€Å"music/arts† was 86.920 – 11.261. The 95% CI for â€Å"university† as a predictor of creativity was 10.426 – 11.961 while the confidence interval for â€Å"other† was 95% CI (8.625 – 10.532). Lastly, the CI for â€Å"no plans yet,† as a determinant of creativity was 95% CI (7.648 – 9.984). Again, it is clear that all the categorical variables have their CI ranging from positive lower boundary value to a positive upper boundary value. This implies that the set of data is somewhat normally distributed as earlier confirmed by the Levene’s F statistic. According to Table 1, the mean for creativity test score (â€Å"creative†) for students who had plans of joining an engineering college was the highest, 12.48, SD = 3.203 whereas the creativity score for seniors who did not want to do anything after college was the lowest, 8.62, SD = 3.378. Students who had plans of doing liberal arts after school had a higher mean creativity score, 11.61 SD = 4.115, compared to those who had plans of joining an agricultural college,11.50 SD = 4.796, or joining university, 11.19 SD= 3.977. The mean creativity score for seniors who had â€Å"other plans† after college was relatively low, 9.58 SD =3.822, but this was higher than the mean of those who had â€Å"no plans yet†, 8.82 SD = 3.220 or those who planned to do music/arts, 9.09 SD= 4.636. Finally, the mean creativity test score for seniors who had plans of joining a teacher college was 9.68, SD = 3.557. Box’s M Statistic and Wilk’s Lambda The Box’s M statistic is useful for determining homogeneity of covariance existing across the various groups of categorical variables. The significance level is usually set at p.001. In this an alyses, the Box’s M = 23.586. The F Test for Box’s M= 23.586, F (24, 3373.80) =.925, p =.568, which is greater than p =.001 (Table 4).Advertising Looking for essay on psychology? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More This implies that there existed no significant differences between the covariance matrices and therefore the assumption of homogeneity of covariance across the groups was not violated. This also gives us a green light to use the Wilk’s Lambda test for the analyses. Since the Box’s M test is non-significant and has proved Wilk’s Lambda as a good test for MANOVA, a MANOVA test was conducted and interpreted using the Wilk’s Lambda test. The significance level was considered at p.05. Table 5 therefore indicates the Wilk’s Lambda =.851, F (18, 984) = 4.603, p =.001. The F value for Wilk’s Lambda is significant indicating that significant differences existed among the plans of seniors’ (â€Å"collplan†) after completing high school on a linear combination of the abstract test score and creativity test scores (dependent variables). In addition, the Wilk’s lambda is large i.e. greater than.8 thus indicating that the null hypothe sis that the categorical factors can be used to determine the student’s creativity and abstract reasoning ability, is supported. Levene’s F Test In a MANOVA test, the Levene’s test is useful in determining whether there are any differences in variances/covariance of every variable across the groups. For the assumption to be maintained that no variance exists across the groups, the Levene’s F should be non-significant, otherwise the assumption is violated (Field, 2009). The Levene’s F for â€Å"abstract† was F(9, 493) =.844, p =.576, indicating that the Levene’s F was not statistically significance (Table 6). It therefore means that there are no significant group differences in variance on the variable â€Å"abstract.† Moreover, the F value is small hence doubts that are brought about by large values of F regarding the null hypothesis are excluded (Tabachnick Fidell, 2001). On the other hand, the Levene’s F value for the variable â€Å"creative† was F(9, 493) = 1.400, p =.185 which also indicates that there are no significant differences in variance on the variable â€Å"creative†. Overall, it can be assumed that the dataset is normally distributed since variances differ insignificantly. Between-Subjects Effects The Wilk’s Lambda indicated that the MANOVA is significant thus it is appropriate to examine Table 7 which essentially provides the univariate results for the dependent variables (abstract and creative). The test of between-subjects effects indicate that the pairs of means for collplan i.e. abstract and creative are statistically different. For instance, the Mean Square for abstract was 24.322, F(9, 493) = 3.390, p =.001 whereas the Mean Square for creative was 99.880, F (9, 493) = 7.440, p =.001. The R squared value for abstract was.058 indicating that abstract reasoning equivalent to 5.8 percent of multivariate variance in the model was contributed by the student†™s career choice after high school i.e. students’ plans after high school. On the other hand, the R squared value for creative was.120 indicating that creative thinking contributed to 12 percent of multivariate variance in the model i.e. determining the students’ plans after college. It is therefore evident that creativity level of a student has a highly contributed by the student’s plans after high school compared to the contribution on the student’s abstract reasoning ability by the same. However it is important to note that both abstract reasoning ability and student’s creativity levels are significantly affected by the student’s career plans after high school. This is confirmed by the fact that F values for both variables are significant at the level of.001. In other words seniors’ plans after high school were significantly different depending on the student’s abstract reasoning ability (F(9, 493) = 3.390, p=.001) and stu dent’s creativity level (F(9, 493) = 7.440, p =.001). Summary The decisions of high school seniors regarding their plans on career choices after completing high school were evaluated based on the student’s abstract reasoning ability and creativity. Factors such as having no plans of a career choice after school, joining a teacher college, an engineering college, doing liberal arts, music/arts, joining university, any other plans or those who had no plans yet were used to determine the student’s abstract reasoning and the student’s creativity. It is evident that overall, most high school seniors did not have any career choice after completing high school. It is evident that most high school seniors do not prefer joining an agricultural college after high school as demonstrated by a low number of students (4) preferring to join an agricultural college. The highest number of high school seniors (88) would prefer to join university after high school, followed by those who would like to do liberal arts (59), and those who had other plans (57). The preference for joining either a teacher’s college or an engineering college was relatively high (38 and 29 students) whereas the preference for doing music/arts was relatively low (11 students only). Having plans of joining a teacher college and/or joining university translated to a high level of abstract reasoning among high school seniors. However, having plans of joining a teacher college translated to a lower creativity score compared to abstract reasoning ability. On the other hand, the creativity level increased with having plans of joining university compared to the effect of the same plan on abstract reasoning ability. Having plans of joining an engineering college was associated with a high creativity score which was beyond the abstract reasoning ability resulting from the same plans. While the lowest creativity score resulted from students not wanting to do anything after high schools, the lowest abstract reasoning ability emanated from planning to join an agricultural college after high school. Having plans of doing liberal arts translated to a higher creativity score than abstract reasoning score whereas having plans of doing music/arts after high school translated to a higher abstract reasoning ability compared to creativity level. There was only a very small difference in creativity level and abstract reasoning ability as a result of having â€Å"no plans yet† after completing high school. The creativity and abstract reasoning ability of high school senior students is demonstrated as being significantly affected by the student’s choice of career after high school. Creativity and abstract reasoning differs depending on whether the student has any plans of joining a specific career after high school or not. Overall, there is a higher creativity among high school students as a result of future career choice compared to the abstract reasonin g ability emanating from the same. In essence, up to 5.8 percent of abstract reasoning is as a result of the career choice a student has after high school whereas 12 percent of creativity is as a result of the student’s choice of career after completing high school. Reference Field, A. (2009). Discovering statistics using SPSS, Third Edition. San Diego, CA: SAGE Publications Ltd. Tabachnick, B. G. and Fidell, L. S. (2001). Using multivariate statistics. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Appendix Table 1: Between-Subjects Factors Between-Subjects Factors Value Label N collplan 1 none 178 2 teacher college 38 3 agricultural college 4 4 engineering college 29 5 liberal arts 59 6 music/arts 11 7 university 88 8 other 57 9 no plans yet 38 10 10 1 Table 2: Descriptive Statistics for â€Å"Collplan† Descriptive Statistics collplan Mean Std. Deviation N abstract none 8.94 2.616 178 teacher college 10.37 2.509 38 agricultural college 7.25 2.500 4 engineering college 10.17 2.156 29 liberal arts 9.97 3.129 59 music/arts 10.09 2.914 11 university 10.37 2.709 88 other 9.74 2.482 57 no plans yet 8.84 2.881 38 10 11.00 . 1 Total 9.59 2.735 503 creative none 8.62 3.378 178 teacher college 9.68 3.557 38 agricultural college 11.50 4.796 4 engineering college 12.48 3.203 29 liberal arts 11.61 4.115 59 music/arts 9.09 4.636 11 university 11.19 3.977 88 other 9.58 3.822 57 no plans yet 8.82 3.220 38 10 15.00 . 1 Total 9.89 3.870 503 Table 3: Estimated Marginal Means and Related 95% Confidence Intervals for Collplan collplan Dependent Variable collplan Mean Std. Error 95% Confidence Interval Lower Bound Upper Bound abstract none 8.944 .201 8.549 9.338 teacher college 10.368 .434 9.515 11.222 agricultural college 7.250 1.339 4.619 9.881 engineering college 10.172 .497 9.195 11.150 liberal arts 9.966 .349 9.281 10.651 music/arts 10.091 .808 8.504 11.678 university 10.375 .286 9.814 10.936 other 9.737 .355 9.040 10.434 no plans yet 8.842 .434 7.988 9.696 10 11.000 2.678 5.737 16.263 creative none 8.624 .275 8.084 9.163 teacher college 9.684 .594 8.516 10.852 agricultural college 11.500 1.832 7.901 15.099 engineering college 12.483 .680 11.146 13.820 liberal arts 11.610 .477 10.673 12.547 music/arts 9.091 1.105 6.920 11.261 university 11.193 .391 10.426 11.961 other 9.579 .485 8.625 10.532 no plans yet 8.816 .594 7.648 9.984 10 15.000 3.664 7.801 22.199 Table 4: Box’s M Test Box’s Test of Equality of Covariance Matricesa Box’s M 23.586 F .925 df1 24 df2 3373.800 Sig. .568 Tests the null hypothesis that the observed covariance matrices of the dependent variables are equal across groups. a. Design: Intercept + collplan Table 5: Multivariate Tests- Wilk’s Lambda Multivariate Testsc Effect Value F Hypothesis df Error df Sig. Intercept Pillai’s Trace .684 532.157a 2.000 492.000 .000 Wilks’ Lambda .316 532.157a 2.000 492.000 .000 Hotelling’s Trace 2.163 532.157a 2.000 492.000 .000 Roy’s Largest Root 2.163 532.157a 2.000 492.000 .000 collplan Pillai’s Trace .153 4.542 18.000 986.000 .000 Wilks’ Lambda .851 4.603a 18.000 984.000 .000 Hotelling’s Trace .171 4.663 18.000 982.000 .000 Roy’s Largest Root .138 7.570b 9.000 493.000 .000 Exact statistic The statistic is an upper bound on F that yields a lower bound on the significance level. Design: Intercept + collplan Table 6: Levene’s Test Levene’s Test of Equality of Error Variancesa F df1 df2 Sig. abstract .844 9 493 .576 creative 1.400 9 493 .185 Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of the dependent variable is equal across groups. a. Design: Intercept + collplan Table 7: Test of Between-Subjects Effects Tests of Between-Subjects Effects Source Dependent Variable Type III Sum of Square s df Mean Square F Sig. Corrected Model abstract 218.894a 9 24.322 3.390 .000 creative 898.919b 9 99.880 7.440 .000 Intercept abstract 6326.276 1 6326.276 881.844 .000 creative 7822.492 1 7822.492 582.683 .000 collplan abstract 218.894 9 24.322 3.390 .000 creative 898.919 9 99.880 7.440 .000 Error abstract 3536.740 493 7.174 creative 6618.497 493 13.425 Total abstract 50020.000 503 creative 56763.000 503 Corrected Total abstract 3755.634 502 creative 7517.416 502 a. R Squared =.058 (Adjusted R Squared =.041) b. R Squared =.120 (Adjusted R Squared =.104) This essay on One-Way Manova was written and submitted by user Shania Kerr to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Sunday, March 15, 2020

The Reform Movements of the Ni essays

The Reform Movements of the Ni essays In the late eighteenth century America really begin to take shape as its own country. In the nineteenth century the change was very noticeable. During this time the country was beginning to see what it is like when you have a country where everyone has the right to voice his or her own opinion. The country was struggling with slavery, what state should be a slave state and which state would not be a slave state. This time in American history several movements begin happening for the good of the country. These movements were happening because of all the different opinions going on in the country. One of the movements that came to front was a movement on prison reform. The way that prisoners were being treated is what led to the reform. Religious groups came forward and wanted to have prisons were the inmates could be treated as individuals and not as animals. Womens right movement also happens in this period of time. Women wanted to have the same rights as men during this ti me in history. The Temperance movement was a movement with the main focus being on alcohol. These movements all happen because groups of individuals got together and decided it was time for a change. These reform movements are what help lead America into the country that it is today. The prison reform movement was started in order to make sure that the inmates were treated as human beings. The prisons at this time were horrible. The living conditions were worse than the prisons we have today. One group that wanted to make sure that the prisoners were treated with respect was the religious group called the Quakers. The Quakers took it upon themselves to try and create their own human prisons. The prisoners in this type of prison studied the Bible, they were able to work, and they were not allowed to speak. Prisoners were expected to carry out their whole sentence, there was no getting out for good behavior. There was no such thing as a par...

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Valuing cultural diversity (by organizations, managers And HRMs Essay

Valuing cultural diversity (by organizations, managers And HRMs Support Role in Managing Cultural Diversity) - Essay Example Perspective is the belief and practices of management carried out with realisation of importance of diversity to a company (Ely and Thomas, 2001). With this view, Ely and Thomas (2001) developed three diversity perspectives, the discrimination-and-fairness perspective, access-and-legitimacy perspective and integration-and-learning perspective. According to Peters (2008), perspectives try to achieve the dual purpose of performance enhancement and social role of unity in diversity. However, the learning-and-effectiveness perspective wields greater importance in times of emergence of global business with diverse workforces. Learning-and-effectiveness perspective intends to achieve individual and organizational goals through creativity and learning of an individual employee in a flexible atmosphere (Thomas and Ely, 2001). As the ‘emerging paradigm of diversity’ it taps the true benefits of diversity (Thomas and Ely, 2001) in the long and short run (Dass and Parker, 1999 cited at Peters, 2008). The real awakening into the contemporary aspects of human resource management made a beginning with Hawthorne experiments (Trompenaaars and Hampden-Turner, 2004). Further studies like the Scanlon Plan, Mayo’s analysis, and the Managerial Grid Seminars of Robert Blake stressed the team-based or group nature of HRM (Trompenaaars and Hampden-Turner, 2004). Ely and Thomas (2001) through development of three perspectives provided the landmark rationale for diversity management in HR systems of organizations. Diversity has gained in importance in organisational life as companies become more diverse in terms of gender, race, ethnicity, age, and nationality (Shaw, Barret-Power cited in D’Netto and Sohal, 1999). Diversity is presence of differences in a social group. (Jackson, et.al, 1992 cited in D’Netto and Sohal, 1999). A diverse workforce shares difference